Family court help

Family Court Help Line
Business Genre:
Short Business Description: Family Court Document Preparation
Call the Family Court Help Line for help with preparing your Family Court self-help documents in Las Vegas.
Long Business Description:

It is very important to do your research when preparing to file with the family court, but who has time for all of that? Do you? If so, we have left the link below to get you started.
Data Entry Services
Entering information on forms can be a daunting task for some. Let our data entry team take that off your hands.
Steps Involved in a Family Court Case

Opening a Case. One person (the “Plaintiff”) files legal papers to start the court action (the “complaint”) and has the other party served.
Responding to the Case. …
Case Management Conference. …
Mediation/Settlement. …
Motion Practice. …
Discovery. …
Trial. …
Post-trial.

More items…
According to the Family Court Self Help Center:
The court you will appear most often as part of your family law matter is the district court. The Family Division of the Eighth Judicial District Court is where family matters are initially heard and resolved in Clark County. There are 20 family court judges in Clark County who are randomly assigned to hear every family court matter. Visit the District Court page to learn more.

Need help with getting or keeping your children?
Cannot afford an attorney or paralegal. Do it yourself and we will help you through the process.

If you need help with filling out family court documents all you have to do is call.
702.609.3688
Our staff has 30+ years of experience with Family Courts and is responsible for the newly revise Statute.

As of February 1, 2020, the regulations set revised guidelines for calculation of a child support obligation. The calculation is presumed to meet the basic needs of a child, but the presumption may be rebutted by evidence.

The schedule for the base child support obligation is as follows:
Calculation of Child Support Under the New Regulations

For one (1) child, the sum of:
(a) Sixteen percent (16%) of the first $6,000 of the obligor’s monthly gross income;
(b) Eight percent (8%) of monthly gross income over $6,000 but equal to or less than $10,000; and
(c) Four percent (4%) of monthly gross income over $10,000.
For two (2) children, the sum of:
(a) Twenty-two percent (22%) of the first $6,000 of the obligor’s monthly gross income;
(b) Eleven percent (11%) of monthly gross income over $6,000 but equal to or less than $10,000; and
(c) Six percent (6%) of monthly gross income over $10,000.
For three (3) children, the sum of:
(a) Twenty-six percent (26%) of the first $6,000 of the obligor’s monthly gross income;
(b) Thirteen percent (13%) of monthly gross income over $6,000 but equal to or less than $10,000; and
(c) Six percent (6%) of monthly gross income over $10,000.
For four (4) children, the sum of:
(a) Twenty-eight percent (28%) of the first $6,000 of the obligor’s monthly gross income;
(b) Fourteen percent (14%) of monthly gross income over $6,000 but equal to or less than $10,000; and
(b) Seven percent (7%) of monthly gross income over $10,000.
For each additional child, the sum of:
(a) An additional two percent (2%) of the first $6,000 of the obligor’s monthly gross income;
(b) An additional one percent (1%) of monthly gross income over $6,000 but equal to or less than $10,000; and
(c) An additional one-half percent (0.5%) of monthly gross income over $10,000.

The regulations define gross income for these calculations in expansive detail, stating what is and is not included for determining child support under the guidelines. The rules also include other criteria for the court to follow in determining support.

Business Website Address: Learn more
Business Phone Number: (702) 609-3688